Data backup and recovery
Information Technology

Data backup and recovery tools and methods

As data is the heart of the enterprise, it is crucial for you to protect it. And to protect your organizations data you need to implement data backup and recovery plan. Backing up files can protect against accidental loss of user data database corruption hardware failures and even natural disasters. It’s your job as an administrator to make sure that backup are performed and the backup tapes are stored in a secure location.

Creating a backup and recovery plan

Data backup is an insurance plan important files or accidentally deleted all the time mission critical data can become corrupt natural disasters can leave your office in Rio with this old backup and recovery plan you can recover from any of these without one you are left with nothing to fall back on.

How important is the data on your system?

Importance of data can go a long way in helping you determine if you need to back it up- as well as when and how it should be backed up. For critical data, such as database, you will want to have redundant backup sets that extend backup for several backup periods. For less important data, such as daily user files you won’t need such an elaborate backup plan, but you will need to backup the data regularly and ensure that the data can be recovered easily.

What type of information does the data contain?

Data that doesn’t seem important to you may be very important to someone else. Does the type of information the data contains can help you determine if you need to backup the data -as well as when and how the data should be backed up.

How often does the data change?

Currency of change can affect your decision on how often the data should be banned for example data that change daily should be backup daily.

How quickly do you need to recover the data?

Time is an important factor in creating a backup plan. For critical systems, you may need to go back online swiftly. To do this, you may need to alter your backup plan.

Do you have the equipment to perform backups?

You must have backup hardware to perform backups. To perform timely backup you may need several backup devices and several sets of backup media. Backup hardware includes tape drivers, optical drivers and removable disk drives. Generally tape drivers are less expensive but slower than other types of drivers.

Who will be responsible for the backup and recovery plan?

Ideally, someone should be primary contact for the organisation’s backup and recovery plan. This person may also be responsible for performing the actual backup and recovery of data.

What is the best time to schedule backups?

Scheduling backups when system use is as low as possible will speed up the backup process. However you can’t always schedule backup for off peak hours. So you will need to carefully plan when key system data is backed up.

Do you need to store backups off site?

Storing copies of backup tapes off-site is essential to recovering your system in case of a natural disasters. In your off-site storage location, you should also include copies of the software you may need to install to reestablish operational systems.

 

The Basic Types of Data Backup

There are many techniques for backing up files. The techniques you use will depend you’re backing up, how convenient you want the recovery process to be, and more.

If you view the properties of a file or directory in Windows Explorer, you’ll note an attribute called Archive.

This attribute often is used to determine whether a file or directory should be backed up. If the attribute is on, on the type of data the file or directory may need to be backed up. The basic types of backups you can perform include:

Normal/full backups: All files that have been selected are backed up, regardless of the setting of the archive attribute. When a file is backed up, the archive attribute is cleared. If the file is later modified, this attribute is set, which indicates that the file needs to be backed up.

Copy backups: All files that have been selected are backed up, regardless of the setting of the archive attribute. Unlike a normal backup, the archive attribute on files isn’t modified. This allows you to perform other types of backups on the files at a later date.

Differential backups: Designed to create backup copies of files that have changed since the last normal backup. The presence of the archive attribute indicates that the file has been modified and only files with this attribute are backed up.

However, the archive attribute on files isn’t modified. This allows you to perform other types of backups on the files at a later date.

Incremental backups: Designed to create backups of files that have changed since the most recent normal or incremental backup. The presence of the archive attribute indicates that the file has been modified and only files with this attribute are backed up. When a file is backed up, the archive attribute is cleared. If the file is later modified, this attribute is set, which indicates that the file needs to be backed up.

Daily backups: Designed to back up files using the modification date on the file itself. If a file has been modified on the same day as the backup, the file will be backed up. This technique doesn’t change the archive attributes of files.

In your backup plan you’ll probably want to perform full backups on a weekly basis and supplement this with daily, differential, or incremental backups. You may also want to create an extended backup set for monthly and quarterly backups that includes additional files that aren’t being backed up regularly.

Tip: You’ll often find that weeks or months can go by before anyone notices that a file or data source is missing. This doesn’t mean the file isn’t important. Although some types of data aren’t used often, they’re still needed. So don’t forget that you may also want to create extra sets of backups for monthly of quarterly periods, or both, to ensure that you can recover historical data over time.

 

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